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Question of the Week 11/17: Do you Journal?

Grasshopper

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Feb 8, 2021
Do you set aside time daily to journal or only when the mood strikes
Do you go back and re-read your journal (if so how often)
Do you find it useful/helpful to growth
 

Mark Ravenheart

Well-known member
Joined
May 28, 2021
Location
U.S.A.
I journal as often as five to six times per week and have been journaling my thoughts, feelings, and events, big, medium, and small for the better part of the past 23 years.

I have C-PTSD and belong to a site for information, researched articles, and peer-based feedback which contains an online forum for journaling. That particular journal has been going for the past 13 years.

I re-read parts of the journal that are pertinent to me at the time and compare my opening journal entry to my current entries about once per month. This journal has been the single most important tool in my healing tool chest for ensuring that I am a survivor of PTSD and not its victim.

I also journal magickal and mundane events as they occur if I see fit and if I believe they will be empowering. Sometimes I do this separately from the main journal.
 

mlee7000

New member
Joined
Mar 5, 2021
Location
Minnesota
Since the 90s, I've been keeping two journals. One is by my bed for recording dreams. The other is a journal for recording feelings or happenings of the day. I tend to write something in this journal daily. Both journals have provided insight into a confusing area or time of my life, but I look back on my dream journal more than my daily journal. However, both are essential to me.
 

TheLastChanceCrone

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 6, 2021
Location
Ohio
Been doing journal work forever - however before 2018 it was sporadic, when the mood hit me or I was working through something huge.
Journalling can be 4 things for me now; private and offline, private and on computer, friends only blogs, public blogs. I do like to share my insights and work as I have been told it helps others.

I tend to go back on the computer ones (blogs or in my journal file) and search for specifics, re-read and then pick up from a specific point. I see my journal work is very much about layers and different perspectives at different times, so it is quite valuable.

Recently however, I have been feeling the urge to purge (aka burn) some of my 1980s-2000 paper journals as the amount of anger, lack of responsibility and angst is just a bit too much, and I have moved past these to the point there is no real purpose for keeping these at all. I am thinking of having a New year's eve burning ritual to clear out these last drudges of very old issues and bless, purge and release that which may still linger. They no longer serve me in a helpful way. I am going to keep my journal from the time I was hospitalized as there are still some very core insights in that one, but the remainder are not me anymore.

For growth? - HELL YES - It has been a lifesaver too.

For example yesterday's response from @Mark Ravenheart about why do I feel compelled to work with someone(s) was an eye-opening set of revelations. I am still processing this but the "you need to play well with others to have friends?" is one of the biggest rooted phrases that is tied to just about everything (there are about 100 variations of that phrase so far uncovered). And almost every teacher, manager, boss, supervisor, parent even dates used it. And most very selfishly, and manipulative ways.

My basic daily journal work is 5 x 5 (5 Gratitudes and 5 blessings) + a card pull for myself (not all days - I may pull for one for the week or the moon phase...whatever feels appropriate)

Great Question btw
 

mlee7000

New member
Joined
Mar 5, 2021
Location
Minnesota
Been doing journal work forever - however before 2018 it was sporadic, when the mood hit me or I was working through something huge.
Journalling can be 4 things for me now; private and offline, private and on computer, friends only blogs, public blogs. I do like to share my insights and work as I have been told it helps others.

I tend to go back on the computer ones (blogs or in my journal file) and search for specifics, re-read and then pick up from a specific point. I see my journal work is very much about layers and different perspectives at different times, so it is quite valuable.

Recently however, I have been feeling the urge to purge (aka burn) some of my 1980s-2000 paper journals as the amount of anger, lack of responsibility and angst is just a bit too much, and I have moved past these to the point there is no real purpose for keeping these at all. I am thinking of having a New year's eve burning ritual to clear out these last drudges of very old issues and bless, purge and release that which may still linger. They no longer serve me in a helpful way. I am going to keep my journal from the time I was hospitalized as there are still some very core insights in that one, but the remainder are not me anymore.

For growth? - HELL YES - It has been a lifesaver too.

For example yesterday's response from @Mark Ravenheart about why do I feel compelled to work with someone(s) was an eye-opening set of revelations. I am still processing this but the "you need to play well with others to have friends?" is one of the biggest rooted phrases that is tied to just about everything (there are about 100 variations of that phrase so far uncovered). And almost every teacher, manager, boss, supervisor, parent even dates used it. And most very selfishly, and manipulative ways.

My basic daily journal work is 5 x 5 (5 Gratitudes and 5 blessings) + a card pull for myself (not all days - I may pull for one for the week or the moon phase...whatever feels appropriate)

Great Question btw
I understand the urge to purge. I did the same thing about about 10 years ago. When I read through them prior to their destruction, I realized I no longer identified with that person. I also didn't need to relive painful memories that I have worked so hard to heal. I was grateful to see how far I had grown and identify areas that still offered opportunities for growth. But, it felt great to release what no longer served me.
 
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